Monday Book Pick: Not a Good Day to Die

Not A Good Day to Die by Sean Naylor
For Memorial Day, I’m going with my Monday Book pick for July 28, 2014.
This book tells the story of Operation Anaconda. It starts with the first planning stages in January 2002, through its conclusion in early March 2002. Up to this point, the war in Afghanistan had been conducted mainly by US Special Forces troops working with various Afghanistan groups and calling in US air assets. Anaconda was the first operation to involve large scale use of regular US forces. In this case elements of the 10th Mountain Division and the 101st Airborne Division. The first third of the book covers the planning and the background of the key players. This is fairly dry, but interesting and informative on why and how the fog of war effected the operation. Intelligence said that there were 200-250 Al Qaeda fighters in the intended AO (Area of Operation). The plan was for Afghan forces, with Special Forces ‘advisers’ to confront the enemy, with ‘escape routes’ to be blocked by Afghan forces and elements of the 10th Mountain and 101st Airborne. The motto, ‘no plan survives contact with the enemy’ is often referenced in various forms in this book. There were a lot more than 250 AQ fighters, later estimates put it at 800 or more. They opened up the US forces almost immediately after they got out their helicopters with small arms, heavy machine guns, mortars, and in some cases artillery. The US forces responded with much more accurate fire and air strikes. Lots and lots of air strikes. From the CIA’s armed Predator drones to B-52s dropping JDAM bombs. The most effective though were the Apache helicopters, which got close enough to see the enemy and pour firepower right were it was needed. The fighting continued much longer than expected, in areas were it wasn’t expected, from a well dug in, and well supplied enemy force. Many of which got to see Allah personally. A well written book about a major operation that dispelled the common notion in early 2002, that the war in Afghanistan was almost over.

Monday Book Pick: 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened In Benghazi

13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened In Benghazi by Mitchell Zuckoff and the Annex Security Team
Mitchell is a journalism professor at Boston University. This is not a political book. It is a detailed account of what happened on September 11, 2012 in Benghazi. It details what the security arrangement were, including the use of local militia groups, who was where during each of the multiple attacks, who died, who was wounded, and what the responses by the State Department were at the time.

Monday Book Pick Archive

 

Monday Book Pick: Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates

Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates: The Forgotten War That Changed American History by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger

This book covers an important piece of American history, the first foreign war fought by the United States. The Barbary nations associated with the Ottoman Empire practiced piracy and enslaved captured crews of any Nation that could not defend its merchant fleet or could not afford the “tributes” the leaders of the Barbary Coast nations demanded as the price to not have ships, cargos, and crews captured and sold. It was President Jefferson (the third President) who decided that continuing to pay foreign nations who held US citizens for ransom (while forcing them to perform hard labor as slaves), and continuing to raid US flagged merchant vessels, was bad policy. President Jefferson persuaded Congress to fund new Naval construction and personnel to take the fight to the Barbary pirate nations. This well researched book details the diplomatic front, as well as the battles fought by the US Navy and Marines.

Monday Book Pick Archive

Quote of the Day

“The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his. For him, it’s all about getting out.”

— Robert Gates, former Obama administration Secretary of Defense on our Dear Leader‘s attitude toward Afghanistan.

Monday Book Pick: Scope of Justice

Scope of Justice by Michael Z. Williamson

The first of MZW’s MilFic Sniper series. The story of two US Army snipers taking on a dangerous mission in Pakistan to take out a high ranking al Qaeda member. It’s full of SNAFU, FUBAR and TARFU. In other words a good description of a military mission. An engaging and interesting read.

Monday Book Pick Archive

 

Terrorist Attack on Boston

April 21, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Global War on Islamofascism, Politics 

Terrorists set off two explosives at the Boston Marathon six days ago, on April 15, 2012, killing three people and wounding hundreds.  We know that it was the work of two brothers, immigrants from Chechnya, both Muslims, with ties to radical Islam.  Based on other Terrorist attacks, including the one at Fort Hood, this is not much of a surprise.

The far left extremists in the MSM/DNC had other hopes.  On my ride home on Monday, April 15, I was listening to WBUR (“Boston’s NPR News Station”), and they had on a so-called “terrorism expert” from Harvard University saying that it was most likely the work of domestic “right-wing” terrorists.  This was not based on any factual track record.  It was their political ideology driving that particular fantasy.  NPR continued to double down on their pet theory.

Yup. You heard that correctly. An NPR “analyst” claiming that Hitler’s birthday is a “motivator” for those with a political view point to the right of center.  Proving once again that history is not a strong point of the left.  He was the leader of the German “National Socialist Workers Party”, with gives him more in common with the late Hugo Chavez, and the staff of NPR, than any registered Republican.

To be fair, NPR was not the only “news outlet” making these kind of baseless speculations. There was usual list of suspects joining in on their bashing of their political enemies while going out of their way to avoid the possibility of this terrorist act being the work of Islam extremists.  You had James Kitfield of the National Journal, CNN, and of course, MSNBC.  Ed Driscoll has a partial list of examples of this faux journalism that is so typical of the left.

Perhaps the best example of this moonbat behavior  is David Sirota, who wrote an article in Salon entitled, ““Let’s hope the Boston Marathon bomber is a white American.”  Look it up if you want, I’m not  giving the a link.  Mr. Driscoll points out that this is pretty consistent behavior for the left.  You have easily documented cases going back almost a Century.

Lies of the Obama regime about the murder of Ambassador Stevens and the embassy attack

Best Damn Video of the Year

Once again, best Damn Video of the Year so far.
She nails how a vast majority of Americans feels about our Dear Leader.

Monday Book Pick: Debunking 9/11 Myths: Why Conspiracy Theories Can’t Stand Up to the Facts

Debunking 9/11 Myths: Why Conspiracy Theories Can’t Stand Up to the Facts by David Dunbar, Brad Reagan and James B. Meiqs

Here is the day after September 11 special edition Monday Book Pick. The kryptonite of those Troofer idiots, actual facts and rational thought.

Monday Book Pick Archive



Two US Air Force airmen killed. Murderer yelled out “Allahu akbar”

That’s according to the New York Times.  The killer made an effort to determine who in the crowd were US Military personnel before opening fire.

No mention of the killer’s religion or the shout in the sanitized CNN story.  Hardly a surprise.

The shooting occurred at the Frankfurt airport.  So much for Germany’s strict gun control laws.

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